1/8″ Dyneema Break Test Final: Bury Splice vs Brummel Splice

For the final it was no surprise to see the bury splice and the brummel splice.  The previous rounds saw knots, specialty splices and things done purposefully wrong, so these should be the top end.

The bury splice, again, is the tapered tail of 72x rope diameter, inserted into the rope to form an eye, and stitched to keep the splice intact under no/low loads. The brummel is the same, but with an interlocking weave instead of the stitch.

Well, as you can see it was the bury splice that walked away the winner, besting the brummel which lost at 2958lbs. This is 134% of rated strength for 1/8″ Endura 12, so pretty happy with the result. If you read the semi finals, you’ll get some explanation of why it’s so far above rated, but it’s nice to know CYR splicing is beating the numbers we use for specifying rope.

Based on the result,  you might ask why we don’t use the bury splice as standard, instead the brummel is the default for sheets and halyards.  The reason is the brummel is faster, and has a locking mechanism which can be verified and can’t possible wear out or be removed.  At the numbers seen in this and other tests, it’s always broken above rated for good quality lines, so I can use rated strength when speccing with no concerns about strength.

For the full series of tests:

1/8″ Dyneema Break Test Bracket: Quarterfinal Rd 1 Skiff Knot vs Bury Splice

1/8″ Dyneema Break Test Bracket: Quarterfinal Rd 2: Loop vs Short Bury Splice

1/8″ Dyneema Break Test Bracket: Quarterfinal Rd 3: Bowline vs Sliding Sling Splice

1/8″ Dyneema Break Test Bracket: Quarterfinal Rd 4 Soft Shackle vs Brummel Splice

1/8″ Dyneema Break Test Bracket: Semi Final 1 Full Bury Splice vs Short Bury

1/8″ Dyneema break test bracket Semi Final 2: Brummel Splice vs Sliding Splice

That concludes the break testing for now, if you have suggestions or requests for similar tests feel free to get in touch with me at kristian@chicagoyachtrigging.com

Dux all in a row

Dynex Dux was the first mainstream heat set Dyneema to arrive in the yachting world, and  had a huge effect on rope selection on racing boats.  Using heat and tension, it gave us higher strengths and lower stretch in a smaller package, and quickly stole ground from not just regular Dyneema, but has replaced Vectran and Zylon as well.

These days, there are quite a few varieties available in heat set prestretched rope. Stopping by this week is the most recent version, and likely the strongest,  from New England Ropes.  I thought it might be interesting to compare the available options, so below are some notes.

On the left is Gleistein’s Dyne One HS.  This is by far the easiest heat set product to work with, as it has a pretty wide angle, and is soft compared to Dux.  It’s also the roundest option, and tends not to flatten out over sheaves.  The downside is the high angle between braids should theoretically make it stretchier.  The other drawback is that it doesn’t seem to be much stronger than regular Dyneema, at least in the small sizes.  Last summer when doing some break testing I found that the 4mm Dyna One HS broke at ~3800lbs, where as plain old New England STS75 breaks well over 4000lbs.  The 9mm shown is supposed to be approx 18000lbs, which is again in line with regular Dyneema.

Second from left is Maffioli Ultra 75, actually the core from 11mm double braid. This is probably the least stretched product, and rated at 17000lbs it’s the weakest as well. It’s kind of an odd duck(x) here as it’s not targeted or made like the others, and I believe it’s just a quick prestretch to take out some of the constructional stretch.

Middle line, in dark gray, is Marlow’s D12 Max 78 product. Rated at ~23000lbs, this is much stronger than the first 2.  It has quite a long angle, partly from construction and partly from stretching.  This is the only SK78 product here, but they also offer an SK90 heatset, for max (ha) tensile.  Marlow has the widest range of fiber choices, and more importantly sizes, going all the way down to 3mm which is unique for a heat set dyneema.  The downside to Marlow is the stretching process makes for a rope that isn’t very round,  as it’s flattened out over whatever bobbin they use to stretch the product.  The Dyneema is a bit fuzzy when new, due to the fibers that fail during prestretching.  This is the choice of high tech dinghy and small cats, as the range of sizes makes for lots of options.

At the far right (I’m skipping the second right for the moment) is a piece of Dynex Dux in 7mm, as I was out of the 9.  The original, and still very good, it has a rated break of ~26000lbs, and is quite round and very stiff with less popped strands than the Marlow. The amount of prestretch is very high, which makes it a good choice for running rigging where stretch is key, as well as some standing rigging and slings.  I really like this material for backstays as it’s so light and strong you can be quite aggressive in downsizing.  Most people call any prestretch Dux, but that can be troublesome as some of the other heatset products aren’t exactly interchangeable as far as strength and stretch.

Second from the right is the newest arrival, an as-yet-unnamed product from New England Ropes.  Pretty excited about it, as it seems to have taken all the best attributes from the other brands and improved on them.  The construction is very similar to Dynex Dux, but lacks the flyaway/popped strands. The roundness of the rope is closest to Gleisteins product, and the smoothness is better than any of them.  NER hasn’t released final break numbers, but the initial tests had it all comparing very favorably with Dynex Dux, which is really saying something.  This particular spool is destined for the VO70 Il Mostro, replacing the Gleistein rope is arrived with.  I’ve got more spools arriving soon and am going to have more info soon!

Tylaska Dogbones

Metal or carbon dogbones are incredibly useful, strong and simple ways to terminate a line or integrate soft attachments. In the past I’ve either had them custom made from aluminum or steel, or cut lengths of steel or carbon. While this works, the custom ones are expensive, and the cut rod versions need lashing to keep them secure.

Much like spool shackles, these make all the sense in the world… once you’ve seen how they attach!  A loop of line is passed through the grommet on the sail, then the dogbone is passed through the loop.  When pulled tight, the loop cinches onto the dogbone and stays fast. 

Continuing their tradition of high quality versions of existing tech, Tylaska has introduced their line of dogbones in aluminum and stainless steel. With working loads from 650 to 15000lbs, there a dogbone for every application here. CYR is stocking select sizes, and will be using these in a number of upcoming projects. Uses for Tylaska dogbones include termination of sheets, halyards and control lines like outhauls, custom loop shackles, bobstays and more. Also in stock are CYR’s range of custom stainless/aluminum dogbones for high loads.


Free Luff Furlers (not for free though)

If you’ve ever wondered who makes those neat spinnaker furlers on the Americas Cup AC45s, or the VO70′s, well, it’s these guys KZ Race Furlers

I had the chance to look over one of their custom units aboard Il Mostro last year, and was impressed by the machining and beefiness of the furler.  The market is absolutely packed with code and spinnaker furlers, but if you’re shopping for one you have to give KZ a good look over.  See the wee and big boat sheets below:

kzbig

kzwee

 

Also in furling news, Ronstan is offering 20% off on their code and spin sail furlers, so if you’re looking for a stellar early season deal, check with us for the best price!

New Dogbone Loops

Soft attachments are here to stay, and finding their way onto just about everything that floats!   One of the coolest bits of gear to come from the movement is the dogbone loop. Essentially a covered loop with a peg they make a wonderful high strength connector.  Used to replace stainless shackles, they can offer real improvements in weight and strength, with side benefits of greater articulation and less damage to gear.  As part of a snatch block or floating block system they give you just the right amount of flexibility to align under load.

The existing options are mostly cut pieces of stainless or carbon, which works ok but can shake loose.  I wanted to try a shaped dogbone that had some security designed into it, and this is the first draft.  Works really well size and handling wise, with it keeping captive in the small end of the loop, and being shaped to fit into the open end easily, but not shake free.  The real question was load testing, and so far we’re blown away at the numbers from even the smallest/weakest size, being at least 10tons.  The “at least” comes from the fact that the 5/16″ dyneema initially used in the test failed first in every single test, so I’ve switched to the full-on covered loops that would actually be used on the boat in order to get proper numbers.  For now it’s pretty safe to say that even the size 0 pegs are going to have a working load of 5T.  More to come on this soon!

Fix and Prevent Traveler Car Failures with Aluminum End Caps

You can prevent the dreaded “how many bearings were in this car, anyway?” question on race day with a little help from Harken.

The standard end caps on traveler cars are plastic, which works great 90% of the time. However in situations where the loaded up car slams over and over into the end stop, these eventually wear out, crack, and deliver to your cockpit floor between 40 and 148 tiny little ball bearings which promptly scatter like cockroaches, leaving your crew to try and catch up to the car before trying to corral all the bearings back into place.

Well, if you’ve done that once, odds are good that once was enough, so these metal end caps might be a good bit of preventative maintenance, or more likely, the caps you should replace the broken ones with next time! Available for older, non CB midrange and big boat cars, they’re more expensive than the stock plastic ones, but well worth it to save lost sailing time and the wonderful excitement of ball bearing wrangling.

Pile O’ Soft Attachments Pt 2

This might be the first year CYR has sold more soft attachments than stainless, and I say bring it on!

Above we have 2 different sizes of Equiplite snatch blocks(4 and 8 Ton), a number of carbon dog bone loops (6 Ton) , and a thimble ring hitch loop (2 Ton)

If you want to try soft attachments on your boat, get in touch with CYR for custom and off the shelf solutions for high strength/low weight/easy articulation connections today.

 

Big Boat check stay upgrade

There are tons of great old IOR boats out there that can benefit from more recent technology.  The old wire check stays and blocks in the picture above were heavy and a bear to use.  We were able to match working loads with much lighter gear and still keep the traditional look favored by the owner. 

The Harken runner block shown (4″ stainless runner) isn’t in the Harken catalog anymore, but is still available on a special order basis, which is great as they’re excellent blocks with a traditional appearance. These weight less than a third of what the old mammoth blocks weighed, and still deliver much less friction.  We replaced the wire-to-rope (yuck!) tails with simple New England STS 75 covered with a Marlow MGP cover.

Always nice to get kind feedback, and one of the funniest of the season Iv’e gotten was from this boat: “I know I’ll get whacked in the head by the checks at least once, so I’d much rather have it be the new runners than the old runners!”

Loops: or why the upcoming film “Looper” should be about rigging

This is somehow the week of the loop! Made loops for 5 different boats in many different varieties. CYR now offers covered and uncovered loops and soft attachments for all sizes of boat. Super strong, light and incredible versatile, they’re not just about saving weight, they also offer lots of options that stainless doesn’t.

Here was todays haul; covered loops in different flavors, uncovered loops, and loops with both carbon and stainless dog bones.


Lots of soft hardware going on in this pic; its a code zero furler tack purchase that had to be removable each year, but would live on the bow most of the time. It’s an Antal thimble, a CYR loop, and a Tylaska soft shackle.

 

Contact CYR for more info, or to replace or inspect your existing soft hardware.